Introduction Part Of A Research Paper

Introduction Part Of A Research Paper-23
You can ask general questions here to guide your readers to the problem and show them what we already know: For instance Many researchers have difficulty when it comes to deciding WHEN to write their introduction.It is important to consider the order your draft your research paper, for as you recall, everything else in the research paper must flow from the Introduction.

In addition to content and organization, writers of research papers should also be aware of grammar and style issues that directly affect the readability and strength of their printed work.

A strong introduction will encourage readers to read your entire research paper and help get your work published in scientific journals.

At the beginning of the Introduction section, the context and need work together as a funnel: They start broad and progressively narrow down to the issue addressed in the paper.

To spark interest among your audience — referees and journal readers alike — provide a compelling motivation for the work presented in your paper: The fact that a phenomenon has never been studied before is not, in and of itself, a reason to study that phenomenon.

Papers that report experimental work are often structured chronologically in five sections: first, Introduction; then Materials and Methods, Results, and Discussion (together, these three sections make up the paper's body); and finally, Conclusion.

(Papers reporting something other than experiments, such as a new method or technology, typically have different sections in their body, but they include the same Introduction and Conclusion sections as described above.) Although the above structure reflects the progression of most research projects, effective papers typically break the chronology in at least three ways to present their content in the order in which the audience will most likely want to read it.As such, they are critical to the evolution of modern science, in which the work of one scientist builds upon that of others.To reach their goal, papers must aim to inform, not impress.The introduction consists of background information about the topic being studied; the rationale for undertaking this study (for “filling a gap” with this particular information); key references (to preliminary work or closely related papers appearing elsewhere); a clarification of important terms, definitions, or abbreviations to be used in the paper; and a review of related studies in which you give a brief but incisive analysis of work that heavily concerns your study.It could be a very similar study or one that supports the findings of your study.They must be highly readable — that is, clear, accurate, and concise.They are more likely to be cited by other scientists if they are helpful rather than cryptic or self-centered.Write the context in a way that appeals to a broad range of readers and leads into the need.Do not include context for the sake of including context: Rather, provide only what will help readers better understand the need and, especially, its importance.Scientific papers typically have two audiences: first, the referees, who help the journal editor decide whether a paper is suitable for publication; and second, the journal readers themselves, who may be more or less knowledgeable about the topic addressed in the paper.To be accepted by referees and cited by readers, papers must do more than simply present a chronological account of the research work.

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